Melbourne
Victoria
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Great Ocean Road

The Great Ocean Road offers one of the world's greatest coastal and scenic drives. Twisting roads with striking views at every turn connects lovely holiday towns. Inland, the road cuts through the Otways, which is a forested landscape ecologically rich and visually splendid. Some of the major sights to look for along the way include Bells Beach, Shipwreck Coast, Lorne, Otway National Park, and Port Fairy.

Bells Beach

One of the natural features that contribute to the excellent surfing conditions at Bells is the underwater rock platform. This is the best place to go surfing and an international surfing competition, the Rip Curl Pro, is held every year during Easter, bringing thousands of tourists and visitors to place.

Shipwreck Coast

This is the famous shipwreck spot where over 80 shipwrecks lie at the bottom of the ocean. The Loch Ard Gorge is the location where the tragedy of clipper ship Lorch Ard, which claimed the lives of 53 people, took place. This coast also houses Great Ocean Road's most recognizable attraction, the Twelve Apostles, which is a series of rock pillars rising majestically out of the ocean. Other notable and distinct rock formations include the London Bridge, Blowhole, and Grotto.

Lorne

Declared an "Area of Significance and Natural Beauty" by the Victorian Government, Lorne is a variety of sparkling ocean, cool Otway forests, cosmopolitan accommodations, sidewalk cafes and restaurants. Louit Bay is a safe swimming and surfing beach while the Angahool-Lorne State Park discloses nature's many treasures.

Otway Ranges National Park

Hundred year old mighty trees, huge tree ferns, cascading waterfalls, and a forest floor describe this park. Cape Otway is a 13km trip off the main road where you can inspect the 1848 lighthouse that towers above the rough cliff. At Melba Gully State Park, boardwalks take on a 35 minute journey through lush fern gullies topped with a dense treed canopy. You'll also see a giant 300-year-old tree that has a 27 meter circumference. The views are captivating and a treat for all.

Port Fairy

The tiny cottages of Port Fairy are reminders of days when the town flourished as a center for whaling in the 1830s and 1840s. The charming old homes and buildings from the last century, such as the gentle ruffling on the Moyne River and the breezes through the stately Norfolk Island pines, will remind you that this is a special place. Historic buildings are converted into bed and breakfasts, restaurants, and diners. Festivals are also another ingredient that enriches Port Fairy. The most famous among the many include the Folk Music Festival held every March, the Spring Music Festival each October, and Rhapsody in June. Each festival attracts thousands of people from all over Australia as well as overseas. Before leaving, get a snapshot of its famous landmark, the huge and beautiful lighthouse.